10 Foods “Made in Canada”

Posted on January 8, 2017 | By Jusep Sim

10 Foods “Made in Canada”

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Canada is a multi-cultural country with many influences when it comes to their cuisine.  When you ask a Canadian: “what is a Canadian food?”, the answers will vary.  However, here are 10 foods made in Canada and our contribution to the culinary world.

1. Poutine

What do you get when you put a bunch of French fries with cheese curds on top then drowned in gravy?  Well, that is what Canadians call “Poutine”.  The origins are often debated but where it was born is not.  Poutine originated from the province of Quebec and they are very proud of that distinction.  Since its inception back in the 1950’s, creative hands have put their own mark on this Canadian dish.  If you’re in Toronto, you will find “Poutine Shops” all over the city and many restaurants who carry their own unique take.  From lobster to foie gras, there is so many versions, it could be a challenge to just choose one.  If you’ve never had it, just go simple with just cheese curds and gravy on your nicely deep fried fries.

2. Peameal Bacon (Canadian Bacon)

Canadians love their bacon but what the world has come to know as “Canadian bacon” is something that every visitor should try once.  Peameal bacon is the “back bacon” from the pork loin.   The reason why it is called “peameal” is because boneless pork loin would be rolled in dry ground yellow peas after it has been dried.  This was done for preservation purposes.  The most popular way of eating peameal bacon is having it with your for breakfast accompanied by eggs and hasbrowns.  The best way to have it is in a bun and eat it as a sandwich with some good mustard.  By the way, Canada supplies over 75% of the global supply of mustard.

3. Hawaiian Pizza

Most would be confused to learn that the  pizza with ham and pineapples was born in Canada.  The now famous “Hawaiian pizza” was born in the most unlikely of places.  A restaurant owner in a small town in Ontario called Chatham came up with the combo back in that 1960’s.  Sorry Hawaii but this Polynesian influenced pizza did not come from the land of Aloha.  

4. Pizza Sushi (aka Sushi Pizza)

There is some debate as to where this take on sushi came from but we can definitively say that it is a Canadian creation of the beloved Japanese delicacy.  Essentially, it is a hamburger bun size patty of rice that is then deep fried where the outside is crispy.  You can have various toppings but usually you will find it with either raw salmon or tuna or both.  Another topping that is popular is barbecued eel.  The pizza sushi will often come with a spicy mayo but you can find various toppings depending where you go.  It’s a delicious way for people to have sushi and this Canadian creation has become a favourite in Toronto and throughout the country.

5. Split Pea Soup

Born in Quebec, same place as poutine, this famous soup has its roots in Canada.  The anchor of this soup is the ham bone with a base that consists of dried yellow split peas.  Most Canadians probably don’t know that this wonderful and comforting soup comes from their homeland.  This could potentially be the greatest export Canada has given to the world.  There really isn’t a better way to warm up in the cold Canadian winter than with a bowl of hot and thick split pea soup.

6. Butter Tarts

If there is something definitively sweet that comes from Canada, you don’t have to look much further than the butter tart.  This delightful dessert is small and wonderfully delicious.  There is nothing here that would be anything less than indulgent.  A pastry shell that is filled in with sugary goodness.  Don’t be surprised to see these delectables with raisins or nuts.   It’s sticky, its sweet and all good!

 

7. Nanaimo Bars

A no-bake dessert bar is a staple in many office parties or catered events.  This truly Canadian treat comes from the town of Nanaimo, British Columbia and typically made with a mix of graham cracker crumbs, vanilla custard, chocolate, coconuts and walnuts.  You may find other versions that have peanut butter and even with chocolate mint.  Any way you have it, it is a very unique treat and all Canadian.

 

8. Ketchup Chips

If there is a snack that is distinctly Canadian, you don’t have to look much further than your local convenience store and grab yourself a bag of ketchup chips.  I’ve heard it said that the most missed snack that Canadians wished they had when they move to another country is this salty and savoury potato chip.  Have some wet naps close by as you because when you’re finished, your fingers with be dyed red.

 

9. Kraft Dinner

Kraft, the monster global company has a Canadian staple: Kraft dinner.  Some would even say that it is a “quasi” national dish.  To Americans, it is known as just mac & cheese which is short for macaroni with cheese.  Canadians eat more of this than anywhere in the world and it may very well be the most purchased item bought from our supermarkets.  It really is a cheap meal and it is a simple macaroni and cheese, however, when you can buy a box for as little as $0.99, how can anyone really go wrong with that?  There are microwavable versions of Kraft Dinner but no self-respecting Canadian would do that if they have the time to do it on a stove top.

10. Maple Syrup

Accounting for more than 75% of the world’s supply, Canada is a powerhouse in this delicious compliment to your pancakes or waffles.  Maple syrup can be found in all sorts of things in Canada.  From maple bacon, maple donuts, maple latte and maple cookies.  There are no shortage of ways Canadians use maple syrup.  This is probably one of the most popular items to give as gifts when Canadians travel outside of Canada and one of the most popular amongst tourists who visit and take back home.

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Each month, we will send you our monthly enewsletter that will uncover the diversity of food from around the world.


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